Quirks of the Marine Corps AD NCO promotion system

Your promotion is first and foremost your responsibility, not your NCO’s or SNCO’s.

ALL INFORMATION IN THIS ARTICLE IS FOR ACTIVE DUTY MARINES

Definitions:

Composite Score: A mathematical calculation of certain data elements
reported on the unit diary and used as a measuring factor for Marine Corps
wide comparison of Marines within a given grade and MOS or OccFld (computed
quarterly).

Cutting Score:A score announced by the CMC for each MOS or OccFld to
which individual composite scores are compared to control the number of
promotions to the grades of Cpl and Sgt.

References:

MCO P1400.32.D W/CH 1-2 – PROMOTION MANUAL, VOLUME 2, ENLISTED PROMOTIONS

 

I am going to cover the quirky parts of NCO promotions.

TIS/TIG

Your Time in Service and Time in Grade with regards to points on your composite score(Score found in MOL) is calculated to the end of the quarter.  What that means is that when you score is recalculated, you will receive points for all of the TIS/TIG in the next quarter.  How that might affect you, is that it can be possible for a Marine to be selected for NCO while technically not having reached the minimum TIG(8 months Cpl/12 months Sgt).

For example if you will hit the minimum TIG in March, you may have a score calculated in MOL as early as January, and would technically be promotable in January and February, if by some miracle you had enough points to get over the cutting score.

These dates and eligibility guidelines can all get very complicated if a Marine has been punitively or administratively reduced in grade, and I would recommend consulting the reference or your Admin to determine when you will be eligible again.  For example a Marine Sgt that has been NJP’d and reduced to Cpl can not be promoted for a minimum of 3 months, but most likely would not be eligible until 12 months due the TIG requirement.

Data Cutoff and Compute Dates

 

 

 

 

MCTFS composite score cutoff dates are probably the most important dates in the Marine Corps when it comes to NCO promotions.   The 20th of the 2nd month before the start of the next quarter is the drop dead date to have any MCI’s, Pros and Cons, PFT, CFT, or Rifle scores IN UNIT DIARY/MCFTS if you want them to be part of your composite score for the next quarter.  Read that sentence again.

The 20th of the 2nd month before the start of the next quarter, is the drop dead date to have any MCI’s, Pros and Cons, PFT, CFT, or Rifle scores IN UNIT DIARY/MCFTS if you want them to be part of your composite score for the next quarter.

If you do not see your MCI’s in MOL prior to the 20th of the 2nd month before the start of a quarter, they WILL NOT be included in the calculation of your composite score.   If you think you should have a computed composite score because you have reached the required TIG/TIS, but you see a “0000” in MOL it is possible that your training or performance record is missing data, such as a rifle score.  In this event, attempt to identify the missing data, and then take that problem to your NCO or SNCO.  It is possible for the command to hand calculate your score, if the missing data is due to an administrative error and not your own shit baggery.  If that hand computed score is above the cutting score you would be eligible for remedial promotion consideration.

Your composite score is only computed for the first month of each promotion quarter, so you are stuck with it until the next quarter.

I have created a score calculator on KillFoot that should be accurate as possible.  That calculator is only as accurate as the information you put in.  Keep in mind that all scores are based on TIG/TIS for entire quarters, not a random month in the year.

If you have questions about the different point factors on a composite score take a look at the “?” on the calculator, as they display the exact reference from the MCO.

When you are promoted to PFC or LCPL take a few minutes to confirm that your Date of Rank in MOL is correct.  Fixing it early is much easier than later, and can be completed at the command level.

Your promotion is first and foremost your responsibility, not your NCO’s or SNCO’s.   If you see a problem or do not understand a timing or score, ask your leadership.  If you show that you care about your own success, others will usually want to help you succeed.

 

KillFoot

 

 

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